Nov 282009
 
Your plants need six primary ingredients.

Giving your plants the nourishment they need through healthy soil should be your number one priority, and compost can help.

Whether you’re starting a garden from seeds or tending one that’s already grown, providing your flowers, fruits and vegetables the nourishment they need through healthy soil should be your number one priority, and compost can help.

Feeding your plants organic matter in the form of compost mixed in with your soil will aid in the provision and absorption of all of these nutrients.

The six primary ingredients your flowers, fruits and vegetables need are:

  1. Carbon
  2. Hydrogen
  3. Oxygen
  4. Nitrogen
  5. Phosphorous
  6. Potassium

Feeding your plants organic matter in the form of compost mixed in with your soil will aid in the provision and absorption of all of these nutrients. Compost is rich in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium, as well as sulfur, iron, zinc, copper, boron and manganese, all of which promote healthy plant growth.

As for hydrogen and oxygen, the moist, crumbly consistency of compost blended with your soil makes it easier for water and air to move through the ground in your garden to most effectively nourish plant roots.

On the contrary, chemical fertilizers do nothing to promote the optimal movement of air and water through soil. In fact, chemical fertilizers do more harm than good as the nutrients they provide are in higher doses than your plants need. Your plants may grow faster with chemical fertilizers, but at the expense of their health as rapid growth creates weak, watery plant tissue, which is what attracts pests and disease.

VERMICOMPOSTING

Though you may use a compost of leaves and yard trimmings for growing your garden, what’s even richer in nutrients is vermicompost created by worms or grubs that decompose your food waste. These composting creatures eat through your food scraps and leave behind organic matter more nutritious than what would normally be created through the traditional churn-and-turn composting method that takes months to produce usable compost. In fact, grub composting bins can break down your food scraps in as little as two days time!

The composting process can be a simple one. With good advice and the right composting equipment, you can feed the soil that feeds your flowers, fruits and vegetables the nutrients they need grow healthy, hearty and strong.

  12 Responses to “Feeding Your Flowers, Fruits and Vegetables”

  1. […] there, most within just a few minutes drive from home. That said, I am bound and determined to grow organic food myself in my new garden patio. So I knew it was fate stepping when I wandered into the Eco Tent […]

  2. I’d love this pass this information on to our clients. Thanks for sharing!

  3. […] the pollution of our soil and groundwater, but they also do not contain all of the nutrients your flowers, fruits, vegetables and other plants need to grow. Compost nourishes naturally while also providing the necessary […]

  4. […] worm poop (called castings) from worms.  The goal is to use the worm composting castings to feed your garden, while putting the worms back to work in fresh bedding.  After you set up your worm bin, it should […]

  5. […] vermicompost produced by earthworms is Deuley’s number one preferred supplement for feeding flowers, fruits and vegetables, including how they can cut your irrigation cost by as much as 50 […]

  6. […] you want healthy plants, you need healthy soil. Whether you’re growing flowers, fruits, vegetables or any other greenery in your garden, feed your soil with nutrient-rich compost and your soil will […]

  7. […] You can reduce your waste before trash day by borrowing a concept from nature with home composting. It’s estimated that more than 12 percent of your waste is food scraps. You can quickly eliminate that waste through worm and grub composting bins that turn your trash into a nutrient-rich material for nourishing the plants, vegetables and fruits you grow at home. […]

  8. […] break down your food waste, your contribution to the food chain extends beyond providing nutritious compost for fruits and vegetables in your garden or on your farm. Using worm and grub composting for breaking down food waste to […]

  9. […] that, Robert and Karl suggest growing your own fresh vegetables, not only for the educational experience but for economical reasons too. “You can pay $1.29 […]

  10. […] these impressive results using just 5 percent of the water necessary to grow the same amount of vegetables by conventional […]

  11. […] there, most within just a few minutes drive from home. That said, I am bound and determined to grow organic food myself in my new garden patio. So I knew it was fate stepping when I wandered into the Eco Tent […]

  12. […] growing plants fast, full and tall if their vibrancy is only a façade? They may look healthy, but flowers, fruits and vegetables soaked with chemical fertilizer instead of natural compost do the earth and your body more harm […]

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